Role: Project Architect and Contract Administrator

Built in 1903, Damson Fell was the vicarage to the nearby village church and was named after the plentiful Damson trees that are a part of this delightful corner of the Lake District National Park, the property is set in private grounds of approximately 1.2 acres. Damson Fell is a fine example of Edwardian Lakeland architecture.

The house itself is particularly well planned around the central elegant stairwell, with three principal reception rooms enjoying a southerly aspect across the front of the house. Following refurbishment and extension, the house now boasts six generous bedrooms and six bathrooms.

 

The works include significant landscaping to part of the garden which responded to the layout of the new rear extension and the changes to the existing house. This new extension provide the opportunity to rationalise the incongruous step arrangement in the existing garden while linking the front and rear gardens at the same level.

The new two storey extension has been designed primarily with its existing context and situation in mind. Proportional to the existing form of the North gable of the existing house, the ridge of the proposed extension sits sympathetically beneath the existing projecting verge. The width of the extension is set back from the corner of the existing house.

The proposed garden room is one large open plan living space, with large sliding doors which can be opened to create a level threshold between the external patio and the internal space.

#DESIGN

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